Glossary: What “Family Member” Means in Canadian

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Glossary: What “Family Member” Means in Canadian

Immigrating to another country can mean an improved quality of life. As it offers excellent work benefits, spectacular scenery, a wide range of opportunities in career and education, and more, Canada remains a top destination for immigrants. 

Before immigrating to Canada, there are certain family members you could sponsor. Learn more about them by reading the terms and their corresponding descriptions below:

 

  • A common-law partner

 

A common-law partner is someone who lives with you for at least one year in a spouse-like relationship. In rare cases, you may still be in a common-law relationship for at least one year but no cohabitation. For further guidance and assistance, you can seek help from our immigration consultants in Toronto.

 

  • A conjugal partner

 

A conjugal partner is a person you have been in a spouse-like relationship with for at least one year but could not cohabit with all the time due to exceptional circumstances. Feel free to contact immigration experts if you want to understand more about the conditions of being a conjugal partner.

 

  • A dependent child

 

A dependent child is your biological or adopted child. They are below 22 years old and are not a spouse or common-law partner. Meanwhile, if they are 22 or older, they have a significant physical or mental health issue or are financially dependent on you. 

The immigration authorities usually consider the age of children at the time they applied. For instance, if you submitted an application when your dependent child was 18, they won’t remove them from the application if they turn 22 when the officer finalizes the application.

 

  • A parent or a grandparent

 

In the context of the Canadian immigration law, a parent or a grandparent refers to your biological parents or grandparents or those parents who legally adopted you. 

 

  • A spouse

 

A spouse is someone you legally married under a jurisdiction that recognizes your marriage. To prove the validity of your marriage, you must submit and present credible documents, such as a marriage certificate.

You are not a spouse under the immigration law if you intend to marry a person to get the opportunity to immigrate to Canada. On the other hand, the immigration law no longer recognizes you and your spouse as married if both of you get divorced and then later remarried to sponsor your spouse to Canada.

 

  • An undeclared family member

 

You could become inadmissible because of your family members when you immigrate to Canada. Because of this, you are expected to evaluate all your family members even if they won’t go with you to the country. The examination the immigration authorities require from you includes background screening and medical examinations. 

Meanwhile, undeclared family members refer to those whom you did not include on the immigration forms and those who did not go through a medical examination. You can sponsor certain undeclared family members through a pilot program.

Conclusion

Sponsoring family members to Canada requires completing necessary forms and showing proper documents. Aside from understanding specific words like the ones listed above, you can always reach out for our immigration services in Toronto for assistance. We serve clients throughout Canada.

If you’re looking for professional help from a trusted firm, please contact us at info@brightimmigration.com or call 1-888-404-8472.

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Our professionals make the difference. Our representatives are recognized by the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council and Law Society of Upper Canada. We are guided by our commitment to professionalism, ethics, and belief in providing our client with access to quality legal care and immigration help. You can rest assured that you are well represented and protected when you choose Bright.

Expert help, expert care

Our professionals make the difference. Our representatives are recognized by the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council and Law Society of Upper Canada. We are guided by our commitment to professionalism, ethics, and belief in providing our client with access to quality legal care and immigration help. You can rest assured that you are well represented and protected when you choose Bright.
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